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A d v e n t u r e -

s p o r t s a n d b e y o n d

Founder Editor

Prasad Purandare

Director

Shardul S. Bajikar

Editorial Assistants

Zubin Narielwala

Alex George

Moulika KV

Consulting Editor

Ayesha Bapasola

Art

Adventure -

sports and beyond

design team

Ruchi Mhasane, Illustrator

Prepress and Production

Ipixel Graphics, Mumbai

Regional Coordinator

Samsul Huda Patgiri (Northeast India)

Advisors

Sharad Chandra

Avinash Khule

Marketing and Advertising

Apoorva Jadye

Published by

Adventure and Outdoors Media Pvt. Ltd.

Management

Suketu Kothari

Kiran Shinde

Padmini Dedhia

Registered Address

No. 4, ‘Belvedere’, ‘A’ Wing, Bldg No. 23,

Tulsi CHS. Ltd., Subhash Nagar,

Chembur, Mumbai - 400071.

Tel: (M) +91-9820239183

(T) +91-22-25211455

Print House

JAK Printers Pvt. Ltd.

Jak Compound, Dadoji Konddeo Cross

Lane, Byculla East, Mumbai,

Maharashtra 400027.

SUBSCRIPTION ENQUIRIES:

Phone: +91-22-2521 1455

E-Mail:

subscriptions@adventuresportsandbeyond.com www.adventuresportsandbeyond.com

Adventure - sports and beyond

is a quarterly

magazine published by Adventure and Outdoors

Media Pvt. Ltd., Mumbai, India.

The information written or photographs are

under sole copyrights of the authors and

photographers mentioned. No part of this

magazine may be reproduced in whole or in part

without written permission of the publisher.

The opinion expressed in the magazine is the

opinion of its author and does not necessarily

reflect the opinion of ‘

Adventure - sports and

beyond’

. Therefore, ‘

Adventure - sports and

beyond’

. carries no responsibility for the opinion

expressed thereon.

Vol.

II

• Issue

001

• August ‘

16

Pages

100

Cover Image: A diver under the blanket of

ice in the Russian Arctic.

Photographer: Dhritiman Mukherjee

www.dhritimanimages.com

Editor’s Speak

With the recent enthusiasm for adventure and outdoor

sports spreading like wild fire, it sadly seems as though

safety and precautionary measures have been shoved into

the back seat of a car that they should have been driving. The

recent news bulletins of a woman drowning in a river rafting

accident in Kolad, and a man falling from his harness while

parasailing in Coimbatore are extremely disturbing, and call

for a comprehensive restructure and enforcement of safety

procedures across sporting disciplines, and throughout the

country.

The impediments to safety in adventure sports in India are

manifold. It begins with ridiculously high import duties

(sometimes as high as 50%) on any foreign equipment,

but once that hurdle is crossed, the improper usage of the

equipment takes its place. To have the right equipment is

paramount and until a competent domestic industry is

developed, the foreign alternatives must become more

accessible. A far more complex issue is the lack of awareness

and education with regards to safety procedures, and of

familiaritywith the environment intowhich one ventures. For

example, a trek through the volcanic Sahyadri range in the

monsoon, though stunningly picturesque, is also potentially

extremely dangerous. The Sahyadris are an ancient volcanic

range, where the hills have been severely eroded by wind

and rain over time, leaving them weak and unstable. Many

a time in the past, trekkers who aren’t familiar with either

the terrain or the conditions have wandered into landslide-

prone areas during the monsoon and paid the price dearly.

A sizeable portion of adventure related mishaps occur due

to human error, and to minimise such error would mean

maximising safety in adventure sports. The need of the

hour is planned growth of the industry, with education and

awareness imparted at all levels. Good quality equipment is

a vital component in most adventure sports, and one that

cannot be compromised on. Currently, the availability of

reliable and trusted equipment is scarce, but that is slowly

changing with major equipment manufacturers, like Petzl,

taking a keen interest in the subcontinent. The ultimate

goal is to have a strong base of home-grown equipment

manufacturers providing high quality equipment, at prices

that are free of the crazy import duties. But until then, there

can be no cutting of corners whatsoever, with safety always

taking the driver’s seat.

​Prasad Purandare

Founder Editor